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Eight Frogs on a Log Peg Game

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Eight Frogs on a Log Peg GameThis peg game board is an excellent beginner project.  Eight Frogs on a Log is the name I came up for this project.  Sometimes you’ll see it called Eight men on a raft.  You can find a lot of other similar projects online with a wide variety of names.  I’ve seen it called Eight me on a raft etc.  For this project I used a scrap piece of oak.  It has no tricky cuts or joinery so you can spend more time trying to solve this puzzle.

The object of the game is move all of your pegs (err frogs) from one side to the other; one space or hop at a time.  The only catch is that you can’t move your pegs backward.  If you make one of these be sure to post it over on the WoodLogger Facebook Page.  I’d love to see how yours turns out.

As extra help I created a simple project plan that you can download for free.

If you need the solution for the game you can download that here.

If you decide not to make one of these, but really want one Check out the WoodLogger Shop.

 

 

Cut List 

Nothing tricky here.  One simple board is all you’ll need.  I had a piece of scrap oak, but any species of wood will work.

  • (1) Board –  3/4″ x 1-3/4″ x 9″

 

Milling & Assembly

Eight Frogs on a Log MeasureEight Frogs on a Log MeasureTo get started on the board game I used a scrap piece of Oak board.  I cut the board down to a width of 1 – 3/4″, with a marked a line cut to 9″ long.
Eight Frogs on a Log Rough CutsThe board was trimmed down to a length of 9″ using my miter saw.
Eight Frogs on a Log Drill PressFor the holes I used a 7/32″ drill bit and drilled them in as far as possible.  The diameter of the drill bit will vary depending on the size of the tees used.  Other common sizes are 3/16″, and 13/64″.  You’ll want to do a couple of test holes to be sure.  I spaced each hole 7/8″ apart.
Eight Frogs on a Log Final CutTo make the board look a little more appealing I cut some rounded corners on each end of my board.  This is an optional step, but it’s also a great time to be creative.
Eight Frogs on a Log SandingBefore finishing the piece I sanded the board using a 60 grit, and then a 120 grit piece of sand paper.

Finishing

Eight Frogs on a Log FinishingEight Frogs on a Log

To finish this one up.  I made sure all of my corners were broken and had no sharp edges anywhere.  I then chose to use Boiled Linseed Oil to finish the board.  This project would also have been great painted a fun color.  If you decide not to make one of these, but really want one Check out the WoodLogger Shop.

 

 

 

 

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Items I Used to Finish this

 

Rockler

13 comments

  1. looks like a mind teaser fun for everyone. you didn’t mention the distance between holes.
    now that I have the ball in the block I think I will try this one.

    • Thanks, I updated the post above. There is a plan I included as well for a little extra help.

      • Have you listed the solution to solve this puzzle? What we have is four men on opposing sides that need to move from one side of the game piece to the other. The only rule you stated was that the men cannot move in reverse. Do the two players take alternating turns? Is their a restriction with regard to how many players can you jump over at anytime? Thanks for the design and the intrigue.

  2. Great little project. I enjoy making games.

  3. Great idea. In your video you mentioned that the solution to solving the game would be listed on your web site but I don’t see it anywhere. Can you please share with me the trick to successfully playing the game? Thank you and keep up the great work.

  4. please publish the solution to this puzzle. anxious to make them for grandkids, but need to know the solution first……thanks

  5. Solution please! We made it but can’t figure yours out. I’ve only seen solution for6 frogs

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